Dr. Ana María González Roldán

Dr.-Ana-Maria-Gonzalez-RoldanDr. Ana María González Roldán is a psychologist and neuroscientist working in the field of chronic pain. In 2008, she obtained a Master of Neuroscience, in the University of Balearic Islands and joined the Department of Neurodynamicsand Clinical Psychology, at the Research Institute on Health Sciences (IUNICS), University of Balearic Islands, Spain. In 2013, she obtained a PhD in Neuroscience from the same University under the supervision of Professor Dr. Pedro Montoya. Her thesis and her main interests involve behavioural, electrophysiological and neuroimaging experiments investigating the neural mechanisms underlying the affective, cognitive and social modulation of pain perception and chronic pain.

At the Edge of Being: The Aporia of Pain

Edited by Heather McKenzie, John Quintner and Gillian Bendelow

ISBN: 978-1-84888-115-0

{Website: interdisciplinarypress.net }

This book represents a challenge to the influential medico-political discourse that seeks to classify and manage chronic pain as if it were a disease in its own right, while at the same time preserving its status as a symptom. The chapters in this volume confront this view with timely reminders that pain as lived experience remains an elusive and puzzling phenomenon (an APORIA) that cannot be better understood by putting aside its phenomenology and simplifying what is left to fit a metaphorical pigeon-hole as a distinct biomedical disease entity.

Description

This book represents a challenge to the influential medico-political discourse that seeks to classify and manage chronic pain as if it were a disease in its own right, while at the same time preserving its status as a symptom. The chapters in this volume confront this view with timely reminders that pain as lived experience remains an elusive and puzzling phenomenon (an APORIA) that cannot be better understood by putting aside its phenomenology and simplifying what is left to fit a metaphorical pigeon-hole as a distinct biomedical disease entity. The authors amply demonstrate that there are other useful frames of reference with equal or even better claims to both legitimacy and usefulness. Readers will be encouraged to contemplate the aporia in different contexts and expressed through a variety of experiences.

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Prof., MD. Sumio Hoka

Sumio Hoka is a Professor and Chairman of the Department of Anesthesiology, Kyushu University, Japan. He graduated in 1978 at the Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu University, Japan. In 1985-1987 he was a Visiting Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA, where he researched anesthetic effects on the reflex regulation of circulation. Sumio is currently working, as an anesthesiologist, in clinical anesthesia in the operating room, and in the pain clinic as well as in palliative care. His interest in pain management led him to the questions about the abilities of medicines treating chronic pain and cancer pain. He followed his interest in considering the different cultural aspects of pain (east versus the west) and the expression of pain in literature. He published books entitled “Listen to the voice of pain” (2005) and “Between sleep and awake” (2009) both in Japanese.

Website: Prof. Sumio Hoka

Book Project: Can the understanding of Pain & Suffering end Suffering?

{Co-writing with Hin Hung Sik and Dr. Smadar Bustan}

 

 

Prof. Gillian Bendelow

Before entering higher education as a mature student, Gillian Bendelow worked in London’s East End as a ward sister and community psychiatric nurse. Gillian has made research contributions to the fields of chronic pain and ‘contested’ illness conditions; mental health and emotional wellbeing; health promotion and lay concepts of health and illness. Core aspects of her substantive interests in pain, emotion and embodiment overlap with other areas of social science, medicine and humanities, and this dialogue is reflected in her current work which is concerned with understanding models of health and illness in contemporary healthcare, with a strong focus on explaining and transcending the often unhelpful divisions and polarisation between ‘the natural’ and ‘the social’, biological and cultural, arts and sciences. Gillian is regularly invited as a keynote/plenary speaker to international academic and policy-oriented events and has received past external research funding from the ESRC, NHS, EU, the Wellcome Trust and cancer charities. She a Trustee for the Foundation for Sociology of Health and Illness and a Member of Advisory Board, Chronic Pain Australia ( 2010- present). She is author of “Pain and Gender” (Pearson Education 2000), “Health Emotion and the Body” (Polity 2009) and co- author of “The Lived Body” (Routledge 1998) as well as many edited books and journal articles.

Book Project: Does emotional pain express itself through the body?

{Co-writing with Prof. Esther Cohen }

Dr. Sandra Kamping

Dr. Sandra Kamping is a psychologist, adult therapist  and neuroscientist working in the field of chronic pain. In 2006, she joined the Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience working with its scientific director Professor Dr. Herta Flor, at the Central Institute of Mental Health in Mannheim, Germany. Her main research interest lies in the area of chronic pain comprising a wide range of chronic pain disorders (i.e. chronic back pain, fibromyalgia, chronic widespread pain and phantom limb pain). Specifically, she is interested in how pain can be modulated by emotional and cognitive factors and how our understanding of these factors can increase the effectiveness of psychological therapies for chronic pain.

Website: Dr. Sandra Kamping

Book Project: How the attitudes towards the sufferer differ?

{Co-writing with Prof. Onno van der Hart }

Prof. Herta Flor

Professor Herta Flor is a neuroscientist and the scientific director of the department of Neuropsychology at the University of Heidelberg, Central Institute for Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany. Most of her work on the topic of pain focuses on the role of learning and memory processes and related plastic changes of the brain in the development and maintenance of chronic pain. A special focus has also been on the development and evaluation of new interdisciplinary behaviorally oriented treatments for chronic pain such as extinction training. More recent research has examined the interaction of body image, implicit body-related learning and brain changes in chronic pain and uses virtual reality applications and body-related illusions in both the assessment and treatment of chronic pain.

Website: Prof. Herta Flor

Dr. Sandra Kamping

Dr. Sandra Kamping is a psychologist, adult therapist and neuroscientist working in the field of chronic pain. In 2006, she joined the Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience working with its scientific director Professor Dr. Herta Flor, at the Central Institute of Mental Health in Mannheim, Germany. Her main research interest lies in the area of chronic pain comprising a wide range of chronic pain disorders (i.e. chronic back pain, fibromyalgia, chronic widespread pain and phantom limb pain). Specifically, she is interested in how pain can be modulated by emotional and cognitive factors and how our understanding of these factors can increase the effectiveness of psychological therapies for chronic pain

Group Description

Most of our work on the topic of pain focuses on the role of learning and memory processes and  related plastic changes of the brain  in the development and maintenance of chronic pain. A special focus has also been on  the development and evaluation of new interdisciplinary behaviorally oriented treatments for chronic pain such as extinction training.   More recent research has examined the interaction of body image, implicit body-related learning and brain changes in chronic pain and uses virtual reality applications and body-related illusions in both the assessment and treatment of chronic pain.